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Missing your weekly board game nights or looking for alternative ways to keep yourself entertained during quarantine? Fortunately, alternative methods such as board game mobile and computer applications make it convenient to play board games with friends and family. However, today we will be looking at what board games can be played over video chatting services.

While dedicated online board game applications make gameplay move quicker and offer fancy graphics. Playing board games over video chatting services offers participants a similar person-to-person connection through video chatting that you would normally achieve by sitting around a tabletop. Here’s how you can play board games over Zoom and our top 8 board games to play on zoom.

Earn points by spotting words your friends don’t before time runs out. Shake the grid to mix up the letter cubes. Then lift the lid and flip the timer. Players have 90 seconds to write down as many words as they can find on the grid before time is up. At the end of the round, score the words. If two or more players find the same word, that word doesn’t count. The player with the highest score wins.

How to play remotely

Boggle is really easy to play remotely. The host shakes the dice, shows the players the result, and each player must create as many words as possible before the timer runs out.

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“Patchwork DOODLE” is Uwe Rosenbergs new game in the “Patchwork” universe. Two and more players age 8 and up experience a whole new “Patchwork”.

How to play remotely

The host must have a copy of the game to play remotely, and all players required a sheet of graph paper and pencil. The host will roll dice to determine which card players get to draw, and each player will draw shapes to fit into the overall puzzle.

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Railroad Ink Challenge is a quick-playing roll-and-write game for 1 to 4 players. Grab a board and a dry-erase marker, and get ready to reach networking nirvana! Roll the dice and draw the routes to connect the exits around your board. Expand your network with railways, highways and stations to collect points, but you will be penalized for any open connections, so plan carefully!

How to play remotely

The host must have a copy of the game to play remotely, and all players required a sheet of graph paper and pencil. The host will roll dice, and the players will fill in the graph paper according to the standard rules.

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As an architect in Welcome To…, you want to build the best new town in the United States of the 1950s by adding resources to a pool, hiring employees, and more.

In game play, Welcome To… plays like a roll-and-write dice game in which you mark results on a scoresheet…but without dice.

How to play remotely

The host must have a copy of the game to play remotely, and all players required a pencil and a printout of the game sheet found here. The host will reveal cards and players will mark their game sheet.

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Choose your dice well in that’s pretty clever! to enter them into the matching colored area, put together tricky chain-scoring opportunities, and rack up the points. The dice you don’t use are as important as what you do because every die that’s smaller than the chosen one can be used by the other players, keeping everyone in the game at all times

How to play remotely

The host must have a copy of the game to play remotely, and all players must have one of the scoring gamepads included in the game. The host will roll dice and players will mark their scoring pad.

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Just One is a cooperative party game in which you play together to discover as many mystery words as possible. Find the best clue to help your teammate. Be unique, as all identical clues will be cancelled!

A complete game is played over 13 cards. The goal is to get a score as close to 13 as possible. In case of a right answer, the players score 1 point. In case of wrong answer, they lose the current card as well as the top card of the deck. Thus losing 2 points. In case of lack of answer, the players only lose the current card, and therefore only 1 point.

How to play remotely

The host must have a copy of the game to play remotely, and all players must have a pen or pencil and something to write on. The host will not be able to play as a guessing player since they will see every word but can give hints during gameplay.

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As skilled members of a disease-fighting team, you must keep four deadly diseases at bay while discovering their cures. You and your teammates will travel across the globe, treating infections while finding resources for cures. You must work as a team to succeed. Pandemic is a cooperative game, all players win or lose together. The clock is ticking as outbreaks and epidemics fuel the spreading plagues. Can you find all four cures in time? The fate of humanity is in your hands!

How to play remotely

The host must have a copy of the game to play remotely, and the game is set up as normal. A camera will be required to stream the board during the game. The host takes their turn as usual. On other players turns, the host will show the players cards to the player and takes the actions they instruct on the board.

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The two rival spymasters know the secret identities of 25 agents. Their teammates know the agents only by their CODENAMES.

The teams compete to see who can make contact with all of their agents first. Spymasters give one-word clues that can point to multiple words on the board. Their teammates try to guess words of the right color while avoiding those that belong to the opposing team. And everyone wants to avoid the assassin.

Codenames: win or lose, it’s fun to figure out the clues.

How to play remotely

The host must have a copy of the game to play remotely and must lay out all the words for players to see. The tricky part is when showing the key to the spymasters. The easiest way to do this is for the host to be a spymaster and send a photo of the key card privately to the other spymaster.

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For best results, we suggest assigning a game night host who will be organising what games will be played, ensures everyone has what they need to play and access to two cameras—one to cover the game being played and the other for the host’s face.

Luke

Luke

Avid Board Game player and Pokémon card collector. You can learn more about me by clicking here.

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